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Showing posts from December, 2015

2015-12-24: CNI Fall 2015 Membership Meeting Trip Report

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The CNI Fall 2015 Membership Meeting was held in Washington, D.C., December 14-15, 2015.  Like all CNI meetings, the Fall 2015 meeting was excellent and contained many high quality presentations.  Unfortunately, the members' project briefings ran simultaneously, with 7 or 8 different presentations overlapping at any given time.  As a result I missed a great deal. 

Cliff Lynch kicked off the meeting with reflections about public access to federally funded research (e.g., CRS R42983), interoperability (e.g., OAI-ORE, ORCIDs, IIIF), linked data (e.g., Wikipedia notability guidelines for biographies),  privacy & surveillance (e.g., eavesdropping Barbies, Ashley Madison data breach, RFC 7624), and understanding the personalization algorithms that go into presenting (and thus archiving) the view of the web that you experience (e.g., our 2013 D-Lib Magazine article about mobile vs. desktop & GeoIP), and much more.  I'm hesitant to try to further summarize his talk -- watchi…

2015-12-08: Evaluating the Temporal Coherence of Composite Mementos

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When an archived web page is viewed using the Wayback Machine, the archival datetime is easy to determine from the URI and the Wayback Machine's display.  The archival datetime of embedded resources (images, CSS, etc.) is another story.  And what stories their archival datetimes can tell.  These stories are the topic of my recent research and Hypertext 2015 publication.  This post introduces composite mementos, the evaluation of their temporal (in-)coherence, provides an overview of my research results.
What is a composite memento? A Memento is an archived copy of web resource (RFC 7089)  The datetime when the copy was archived is called its Memento-Datetime.  A composite memento is a root resource such as an HTML web page and all of the embedded resources (images, CSS, etc.) required for a complete presentation.  Composite mementos can be thought of as a tree structure.  The root resource embeds other resources, which may themselves embed resources, etc.  The figure below shows…