Posts

Showing posts from September, 2013

2013-09-09: MS Thesis: HTTP Mailbox - Asynchronous RESTful Communication

Image
It is my pleasure to report the successful completion of my Master's degree thesis entitled "HTTP Mailbox - Asynchronous RESTful Communication". I have defended my thesis on July 11th and got my written thesis accepted on August 23rd 2013. In this blog post I will briefly describe the problem that the thesis is targeting at followed by proposed and implemented solution to the problem. I will walk through an example that will illustrate the usage of the HTTP Mailbox then I will provide various links and resources to further explore the HTTP Mailbox.

Traditionally, general web services used only the GET and POST methods of HTTP while several other HTTP methods like PUT, PATCH, and DELETE were rarely utilized. Additionally, the Web was mainly navigated by humans using web browsers and clicking on hyperlinks or submitting HTML forms. Clicking on a link is always a GET request while HTML forms only allow GET and POST methods. Recently, several web frameworks/libraries have s…

2013-09-06: Wolfram Data Summit 2013 Trip Report

Image
I was fortunate enough to be invited to present at the 2013 Wolfram Data Summit in Washington DC, September 5-6, 2013.  My talk was about the future of web archiving, but the focus of the data summit was "big data".  As such, there was a variety of disciplines represented at the summit since the unifying factor was the scale of the data.  Logistics dictated that I missed several of the presentations, but many of the ones I did attend were very engaging.  The slides will be posted at the Wolfram site later, but I'll provide some short summaries below (2013-11-26 edit: the presentations are now available).

First was Greg Newby presenting about Project Gutenberg, the long-running collection of free ebooks.  His focus was on PG as a portable collection, which is subtly different from universal access from different interfaces (even if the interface is just Google).  The focus was more on PG as a collection to be explored and personalized services to be built-on.  During the…